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A Collaborative Approach to Food Safety

Two experts note how improved indusry-regulator communications helped in the U.S.

Food safety issues have continued to plague Taiwan, despite comprehensive efforts by the regulatory agencies following the waste-oil scandals of 2014 to upgrade and enhance food safety surveillance. At the same time, the food industry complains that many of the regulations and practices put into place to ensure that Taiwan’s food is safe and free of both contamination and fraudulent ingredients are unreasonable and ineffectual, entail great costs for food producers and sellers, and offer minimal benefits to consumers.

Relations between industry and regulators, including the Taiwan Food and Drug Administration, the Council of Agriculture, and the Customs Administration, continue to be testy, with little collaboration or cooperation.

There’s got to be a better way.

On March 12, AmCham Taipei’s Retail Committee, in association with Costco Wholesale Corp. Taiwan, invited visiting U.S. experts to describe a more cooperative approach to food safety at a forum entitled “Effective Advocacy on Food Safety.”  Michael Taylor, a former deputy commissioner of Foods and Veterinary Medicine at the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, and Craig Wilson, vice president of Quality Assurance and Food Safety for Costco Wholesale Corp., discussed how industry, government, and consumer groups in the United States collaborated on creating the comprehensive legal and regulatory framework, the Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA).

From left to right: AmCham Taipei President William Foreman; Speaker Michael Taylor, Former Deputy Commissioner at Foods and Veterinary Medicine at the U.S. Food and Drug Administration; Craig Wilson, Vice President, General Merchandising Manager of Quality Assurance / Food Safety, Non-Foods Quality Assurance, Environmental Services /Haz Mat and Merchandise Services, Costco Wholesale Corporation

“We saw tremendous alignment of government, industry, and consumers along the goal of making the food supply as safe as we could, and put in place modern standards,” said Taylor, who oversaw the entire process. The FSMA was signed into law by President Obama in 2011 and its implementation continues today.

But getting to that point wasn’t easy, Taylor recounted. He said that an outbreak of E.coli contamination in a popular fast food restaurant chain in the early 1990s, which killed four children and permanently injured more than 500 others, forced the U.S. Department of Agriculture and the beef industry to acknowledge “that you cannot fight the goal of food safety,” said Taylor.

“It triggered a mindset shift,” he explained. While previously industry and government had operated on the assumption that contamination was an inevitable reality and that consumers were responsible for ensuring the adequate preparation of their own food, “it is now widely accepted that its industry’s responsibility to do everything it can to make the food safe for consumers.”

Further outbreaks in the mid-2000s involving leafy green vegetables and other foods also triggered efforts by regulators and industry to collaborate on improving food safety monitoring. An outbreak of salmonella in a wide range of peanut products that killed nine people and severely sickened thousands, however, was the final straw. The food industry actually approached Congress to say: “We need our industry better regulated.”

The result was the FSMA. Signing the law, however, was just the beginning of the process, as the legal concepts needed to be converted into concrete regulations. Once again, “enormous collaboration between industry and government was required to get these regulations right,” said Taylor. “Now we are working to achieve comprehensive compliance.”

Could such an approach work in Taiwan? Neither presenter was willing to state that the model would definitely be applicable to Taiwan’s specific culture or food market. Yet perhaps more open communication between the authorities and the private sector could enable Taiwan to make faster progress in enhancing food safety.

Interested in attending our events? Join us at other upcoming events, click here.

Note: AmCham events are intended primarily for AmCham members and their guests. Many events are open to members’ guests and other non-members, but the attendance of any non-member must be approved in advance. AmCham reserves the right not to admit a non-member to any event without explanation.

Gain More Shoppers for Your Brand 

Every day, we pass by hundreds of products, advertisements, and business logos, on the streets or on the internet, but only a few of them catch our eyes. What is the difference between the brands that capture our attention and those neglected? For a company, how to stand out among millions of brands – and most of all, what is the secret to owning a sustainable brand in this ever-changing world?

On November 30, the AmCham Retail and Cosmetics Committees jointly invited Marcy Kou, CEO of Kantar Worldpanel Asia, to break down the secrets behind a successful brand. On the topic of “Gain More Shoppers for Your Brand,” Kuo pointed out that the key to building an influential brand is the ability to recruit incremental shoppers.

From left to right: AmCham President Andrea Wu; Speaker Marcy Kou, CEO of Kantar Worldpanel Asia; AmCham Retail Committee Co-Chair Mark Chen, General Manager of Abbott Laboratories Services Corp., Taiwan Branch.

Kou presented five tips to expanding the number of shoppers:

  • More moments – Associate your brand with a special moment, and encourage shoppers to share their moments. This is a prevailing approach on the internet.
  • More presence – Recurring presence reinforces brand images on customers’ minds, and thus differentiates your brand from your competitors.
  • More targets – Reach out to new groups of shoppers. For example, vegan flavors help an ice cream brand obtain new customers.
  • More categories – Diversify product lines for various types of consumers, such as kids.
  • New needs – Create or discover new features from existing products. For instance, a company that sells probiotic beverages extended their business into beauty masks made from the same ingredients as the beverage.

Providing new incentives for consumers to make a purchase and further share their user experiences are what enable a brand to stay at the top of the game.

Interested in attending our events? Join us at other upcoming events, click here.

Note: AmCham events are intended primarily for AmCham members and their guests. Many events are open to members’ guests and other non-members, but the attendance of any non-member must be approved in advance. AmCham reserves the right not to admit a non-member to any event without explanation.

Panel Discussion on Food Safety

Taiwan’s food-related scandals in recent years have aroused public attention regarding the safety and reliability of the food supply. In an effort to provide a communication platform to enhance understanding of food safety laws and regulations, AmCham Taipei’s Retail Committee conducted a Chinese-language Food Safety Forum at The Sherwood Taipei on October 17. The event was sponsored by Pfizer Ltd.

The following guest speakers were invited to share office practices and discuss strategies for increasing the international competitiveness of Taiwan’s food industry:

  • Fu Hsu, Director of the Food Safety Office of the Executive Yuan
  • Mark Petry, Chief of the Agricultural Section of the American Institute in Taiwan
  • Jenny Yueh-Ing Chang, Executive Director of the International Life Sciences Institute

From left to right: Mark Petry, Chief of the Agricultural Section of the American Institute in Taiwan, Jenny Yueh-Ing Chang, Executive Director of the International Life Sciences Institute, Fu Hsu, Director of the Food Safety Office of the Executive Yuan, and Moderator Lucy Sun Hwang, Distinguished Professor in the Food Science and Technology Department at National Taiwan University.

The speakers addressed topics covering 1) policy development and coordination for food safety systems, 2) risk assessment and management, 3) preventative controls, and 4) crisis management. Through case sharing and discussions, the seminar aimed to provide participants with a more comprehensive understanding of domestic and international food-safety practices.

Following the session, Moderator Lucy Sun Hwang, Distinguished Professor in the Food Science and Technology Department at National Taiwan University, gave attendees a chance to raise questions to the panel.

Interested in attending our events? Join us at other upcoming events, click here.

Note: AmCham events are intended primarily for AmCham members and their guests. Many events are open to members’ guests and other non-members, but the attendance of any non-member must be approved in advance. AmCham reserves the right not to admit a non-member to any event without explanation.