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USEPA Meets with AmCham Taipei

During a recent visit to Taipei, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) Acting Assistant Administrator Jane Nishida, met with AmCham Taipei on July 7th. Nishida has over 30 years of environmental experience working in federal and state government, and international and nongovernmental organizations. She currently leads EPA’s international and tribal engagements, and works closely with tribal governments, foreign governments, international organizations, and other U.S. agency partners on matters relating to environmental policy and program implementation in tribal lands and internationally.

Justin Harris, Senior Program Manager from the EPA, accompanied Nishida to meet with members from AmCham Taipei, including President Andrea Wu; Sustainable Development Committee Co-chair Kenny Jeng, A/P Product Stewardship Manager of DuPont Taiwan Ltd. and Co-chair Cosmas Lu, Strategy Adviser of Super Dragon Technology Co. Ltd.,; Public and Government Affairs Consultant Stella Lai from Dell Taiwan; and Senior Manager for APJ Environmental Affairs & Producer Responsibility Vivian Tai, also from Dell.

From left to right: Anna Wang, Economic Officer, AIT Econ Section; Kenny Jeng of DuPont Taiwan, AmCham Taipei Sustainable & Development Committee Co-chair; Andrea Wu, AmCham Taipei President; Jane Nishida, USEPA Acting Assistant Administrator; Cosmas Lu of Super Dragon, AmCham Taipei Sustainable Development Committee Co-chair; Stella Lai of Dell Taiwan, AmCham Taipei Tax Committee Co-chair; Vivian Tai, also from Dell Taiwan; and Justin Harris, USEPA Senior Program Manager

The purpose of the trip was to meet with the Taiwan government and U.S. business community to discuss the different elements of the U.S.-Taiwan and APEC regional environmental cooperation. Some of the key areas of discussion include 1) Monitoring Air Quality 2) Mercury Pollution 3) Circular Economy and 4) International E-Waste Network (IEWN). Members of AmCham Taipei also exchanged their views with the USEPA officials on corporate sustainability programs and challenges in the region, especially Taiwan.

Launch of the 2017 Taiwan White Paper

With a morning press conference attended by 28 media outlets and a luncheon presentation before 112 Chamber members and guests, AmCham Taipei released its 2017 Taiwan White Paper on June 8. At the luncheon meeting in the Grand Ballroom of the Mandarin Oriental Taipei, AmCham Chairman Albert Chang and President Andrea Wu officially presented a copy of the new White Paper to Minister Chen Tain-jy of the National Development Council (NDC), who received it on behalf of the Taiwan government.

Minister Chen of the NDC accepted the Taiwan White Paper on behalf of the Taiwan government.

AmCham Taipei has published the Taiwan White Paper annually since 1996 to provide the Taiwan government with constructive suggestions on how to strengthen the business climate. This year marks the 20th year since the White Paper was first published in bilingual format in 1997.

Chang’s briefing focused on five major themes related to the performance of President Tsai Ing-wen’s administration during its first year in office:

  • A major advance in regulatory transparency. Chang said the government’s decision last year to extend the notice and comment period for new laws and regulations from 14 to 60 days was “cause for major celebration.” He said that government agencies’ collection of more input from stakeholders should lead to more effective rule-making, especially if it spurs real dialog between the regulators and the regulated.
  • Opportunities for investment. The administration’s ambitious “5+2 Innovative Industries” plan has attracted interest from foreign companies, especially in the fields of the Internet of Things, biomedical, and green energy. But Chang cautioned against allowing the construction of physical facilities to overshadow the need to foster the right innovation-stimulating “software” by cultivating talent, creativity, and culture.
  • A problematic labor law. Recent amendments to the Labor Standards Law are geared to the factory-based circumstances of the “old economy” rather than the service-centered, knowledge-oriented model that must constitute Taiwan’s future. The rigid rules on working hours, overtime, and other working conditions will in fact serve to stifle creativity. Means must be found to incorporate more flexibility into the rules.
  • Continued energy uncertainty. For Taiwan industry, it is crucial to have sufficient, reliable, and cost-competitive electrical power. But many observers are unsure how Taiwan will be able to achieve that objective while also meeting its announced dual goals of eliminating nuclear power and drastically cutting carbon emissions. Industry needs the government to provide a clear roadmap for Taiwan’s future energy development.
  • Bolster trade ties with the United States. Although the future of the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) is now very much in doubt after the U.S. pull-out, Taiwan still needs to find ways to diversify trade and avoid marginalization in the international economic arena. AmCham supports the idea of “free and fair” bilateral trade agreement between Taiwan and the United States. Taiwan after all is America’s 10th largest trading partner, and the two have enjoyed a long and fruitful economic relationship. Although the Trump administration has opposed multilateral agreements, it has left the door open to bilateral pacts, and Taiwan would be a highly suitable negotiating partner as long as it is willing to follow international standards and practices in its trade policies.

In addition to those broad themes, the 2017 Taiwan White Paper includes 83 sector-specific recommendations from 24 AmCham committees or industry groups.

Looking back at the 80 suggestions raised by AmCham committees in the 2016 Taiwan White Paper, the Chamber found that not a single one had been fully resolved in the past year, although eight issues were rated as showing satisfactory progress. Chang said the lack of complete resolution of any issues was reason for concern but not pessimism.

“We hope to work closely with the government to bring about more traction on issues of importance to our member companies,” he said.

To facilitate that progress, AmCham this year identified 12 Priority Issues for Special Attention, selected as having both the potential for high impact and feasibility for relatively early resolution. The Chamber is asking the government to assign a point-person to be responsible for monitoring the progress of all 80 suggestions, but especially the 12 Priority Issues, and to liaise with AmCham at least every quarter to discuss their status.

In remarks delivered after accepting the White Paper, Minister Chen said the government values its longstanding good relationship with AmCham and will take the White Paper recommendations very seriously.

View the full photo gallery here

Two Congresswomen Visit AmCham Taipei

Representative Brenda Lawrence (D-MI) and Representative Nanette Barragan (D-CA) called at the AmCham Taipei office on May 9 during their three-day stay in Taiwan. Accompanied by Congresswoman Lawrence’s legislative aide Alex Huang, a Taiwanese-American, they met with the Chamber’s Senior Director Don Shapiro, Senior Director for Government & Public Affairs Amy Chang, and Government & Public Affairs Manager Erica Lai. The group was joined by two representatives from Herbalife Nutrition, whose headquarters in the Los Angeles area is near Congresswoman Lawrence’s district: Taiwan General Manager Ceasar Chen and Senior Manager for Regulatory, Government & Industry Affairs Alex Lin.

Representative Lawrence explained that the main purpose of the trip was to make up for her inability to come last year for the inauguration of President Tsai Ing-wen and Vice President Chen Chien-jen. But she and Representative Barragan, whose district is in Detroit, were also looking for potential business opportunities in Taiwan for companies in their districts. As skilled manpower training and port operations are among their particular interests, their itinerary included Taiwan’s occupational training center and Kaohsiung Harbor.

From left to right: Amy Chang, Chamber’s Senior Director for Government & Public Affairs; Don Shapiro, Chamber’s Senior Director; Representative Nanette Barragan (D-CA); Representative Brenda Lawrence (D-MI); Ceasar Chen, General Manager, Herbalife Taiwan Inc.; Alex Lin, Senior Manager of Worldwide Regulatory, Government, & Industry Affairs at Herbalife Taiwan Inc.

Leadership Meeting with AIT Chairman James Moriarty

During his latest visit to Taiwan, the U.S.-based chairman of the American Institute in Taiwan, Ambassador James Moriarty, exchanged views with members of the AmCham Taipei leadership today at a breakfast discussion. The two sides discussed the relationship between the United States and Taiwan, including economic ties, as well as regional issues.

AmCham leaders also briefed the AIT chairman on such subjects as the Chamber’s 2017 Business Climate Survey, difficulties for companies and employees caused by recent revisions in the Labor Standards Law, and prospective business opportunities arising from the government’s Asia·Silicon Valley plan to promote the digital economy.

Attending the meeting from AIT Taipei were Economic Section Chief Jeff Horwitz, Commercial Section Chief Ireas Cook, and Economic Section Deputy Chief Michael Pignatello. Representing AmCham were President Andrea Wu, Vice Chairman Daniel Tseng, Government Relations Committee Co-chair Paul Cassingham, AmCham Secretary and IP&L Committee Co-chair Vincent Shih, AmCham Governor Leo Seewald, AmCham Supervisor and Travel & Tourism Committee Co-chair Anita Chen, Retail Committee Co-chair Mark Chen, Sustainable Development Committee Co-chair Kenny Jeng, Senior Director and Taiwan Business TOPICS Editor-in-chief Don Shapiro, and Senior Director for Government & Public Affairs Amy Chang.

Technology Licensing Expert Dialogue

The American Chamber of Commerce in Taipei (AmCham), in partnership with the American Institute in Taiwan (AIT) and the Taipei Economic and Cultural Representative Office in the United States (TECRO), and the Taiwan–USA Industrial Cooperation Office (TUSA), hosted a Technology Licensing Expert Dialogue on March 30.

Building on the success of the second Digital Economy Forum in October, 2016, the dialogue brought together legal and technology experts from the United States and Taiwan to discuss practical guidance on the booming US$5 billion trade in technology licensing. The esteemed speakers included Hong Shu-ming, Director General of the Taiwan Intellectual Protection Office (TIPO) and the Honorable Judge Sidney H. Stein of the United States District Court Southern District of New York, who opened the forum.

Hosted by Kris Kvols, economic officer at AIT, over 100 participants listened to presentations discussing myriad complexities of licensing technology between American, Taiwanese, and Chinese markets.

Special Luncheon: Time to Revamp the Company Act

More than 15 years has passed since the Company Act was last amended in 2001. Comprehensive amendments are widely viewed as long overdue given the many challenges arising from the transformation of industries, the emergence of micro e-commerce businesses, the aging population, the increasing importance of stakeholders, and environmental sustainability.

On March 29th, we invited members and guests to join an important workshop, “Time to Revamp the Company Act” led by the “Steering Committee of Company Act Reform” (the Steering Committee). The effort was aimed at discussing proposed amendments and recommendations to Taiwan’s Company Act.  At the workshop, participants were able to ask questions and network with people facing similar challenges and issues.

* This event was conducted in Chinese. 

From left to right: Chen Yen-liang (陳彥良) Professfor at NTU, Huang Ming-jye  (黃銘傑) Professfor at NTU, Faung Kai-lin (方嘉麟) Professor at Chengchi University, Andrea Wu AmCham Taipei President, Tseng Wang-ruu (曾宛如) Professor at NTU, Vivian Ho (何嘉容) Tax Partner at KPMG, Chu Te-fang (朱德芳) Professor at Chengchi University

Topics covered at the workshop:

  • Explanations on why changes to the Company Act are so urgently needed
  • The foreign laws that have been considered and approaches undertaken by the committee during their study
  • The major proposed revise to the Company Act
  • The government and the general public reaction to the proposed changes
  • Any feedback from AmCham members?

Interested in attending our events? Join us at other upcoming events, click here.

Note: AmCham events are intended primarily for AmCham members and their guests. Many events are open to members’ guests and other non-members, but the attendance of any non-member must be approved in advance. AmCham reserves the right not to admit a non-member to any event without explanation.

Event Reminder: Technology Licensing Expert Dialogue

The American Chamber of Commerce in Taipei is pleased to co-host with the Taiwan-USA Industrial Cooperation Promotion Office (TUSA) of the Ministry of Economic Affairs and The American Institute in Taiwan (AIT) a “Technology Licensing Expert Dialogue” on March 30, 2017. Members of the media are invited to cover the opening session of the dialogue.

Members of the media who plan to cover this event are required to sign up with AIT’s Public Diplomacy Section by noon on March 29 via email to [email protected] or fax 2162-2242.

Event:             Technology Licensing Expert Dialogue

Time:               9:00 – 10:00 a.m., Thursday, March 30, 2017

Venue:             AIT’s American Center – 21st Floor, 333 Keelung Road, Section 1, Taipei

Language:        English with simultaneous interpretation

 

Agenda:

08:40 – Media registration

09:00 – Welcome remarks by Christian Marchant, Acting Deputy Director, AIT

  • Remarks by Mei-hua Wang, Vice Minister, Ministry of Economic Affairs
  • Remarks by Mark Cohen, Senior Counsel, United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO)

09:20 – Group Photos

09:25 – Keynote Speeches

  • TIPO, Your Best Partner!, Shu-min Hong, Director General, TIPO (Taiwan Intellectual Property Office)
  • Maximizing IP Commercialization:  Less is More, Honorable Judge Sidney H. Stein, United States District Court Southern District of New York

10:00 – Opening Session Concludes

The expert dialogue will address the legal framework and provide practical guidance for industry participants in the thriving US$5 billion U.S.-Taiwan licensing trade.  This trade creates value through spurring innovation, disseminating technology, and generating income for intellectual property owners through technology transfer and commercialization. This program is being held in furtherance of the October 2016 Digital Economy Forum, at which both sides affirmed the importance of intellectual property rights and licensing to expand two-way technology trade and investment between the two economies.

For more information, please contact the AmCham Government & Public Affairs or tel: 02-2718-8226 ext. 213

Remarks by AmCham Taipei Chairman, Albert Chang at the AmCham Taipei Banquet, Hsien Nien Fan

The American Chamber of Commerce in Taipei held its 49th annual Hsieh Nien Fan banquet on March 22nd in the Grand Ballroom of the Grand Hyatt Taipei.

Opening the evening were remarks by AmCham Taipei Chairman, Albert Chang, who expressed thanks on behalf of the Chamber to both the Taiwan government and AIT for helping to promote a positive business environment in Taiwan. He stressed the findings of AmCham Taipei’s recent 2017 Business Climate Survey that an already excellent business environment – especially with regard to quality of life and human capital – could easily be further improved through greater regulatory transparency and consistency.

A transcript of the chairman’s remarks is as follows:

Welcome, Good evening! President Tsai, Ministers, AIT Director Moy, AmCham Members, and Distinguished Guests. Let me say a warm welcome to AmCham Taipei’s annual Hsieh Nien Fan!

This is a historic evening. Every year, for the past 49 years, AmCham has gathered together the top leaders from government and international business. And tonight, we have set a new record of nearly 700 people here. To Director Moy and our fellow AIT leaders, we are so happy to have you with us tonight. This is a historic night, because tonight we welcome someone who herself has made history. Madam President, let me say, on behalf of AmCham Taipei, we are so honored to have you with us this evening. And so to you, your Ministers, and the 100-plus government officials here tonight, we offer a warm welcome and a heartfelt thank you.

As we gather here tonight, we have so much to celebrate.

The leaders in this room have personally overseen the creation of thousands-upon-thousands of high-quality high-paying jobs and billions of dollars of investment in Taiwan. Let’s not forget these are not numbers on a piece of paper. The companies in this room have done their part to improve the lives of the average Taiwanese citizen in very real ways.

When we asked our members in our most recent Business Climate Survey about their hiring and investment plans, they told us that they are doubling down here. Half of the companies in our Survey responded that they grew their headcount and investment in Taiwan in 2016. Half of the companies responded that Taiwan is a top 10 global priority for their company.

On quality of life, an overwhelming majority expressed enthusiasm for the quality of Taiwan’s workforce and the outstanding living environment. Some even joked that Taiwan is the only place in the world where the taxi drivers are nicer than the passengers! Even for me personally, when people tell me my Chinese has improved, I tell them I learn everything I know from our taxi drivers! But then when they say my accent is so bad, I guess I know who’s to blame.

On regulations, under Premier Lin Chuan’s leadership, the notice and comment period for new regulations has been extended from 14 days to 60 days, facilitating stronger input on proposed regulatory changes.

We thank President Tsai and the Taiwan government for creating an environment that welcomes the world’s leading companies to plant their flag in Taiwan and encourages them to invest, innovate, and grow here.

But, at the same time, we are not naïve, we all know that there is still much more work to do to unlock the next wave of growth in jobs and investment. If there is one message from our members on the state of the business environment in Taiwan, it is that we need to accelerate the pace of improvement.

And we need to do it in 3 key areas:

  • Number 1: Government regulations – Regulations are the essential glue to a well-functioning, modern economy like Taiwan. But this is one area our members said Taiwan needs to step up. We’re looking for more transparency around the regulatory process; and we need more time and more opportunities to provide meaningful input into the process by which new laws are formulated and approved. This is the single biggest issue for international businesses here year after year.
  • Number 2: Labor law –In today’s digital economy, where whole industries are being disrupted by fast-moving innovators, labor laws need to keep up. Labor laws in Taiwan need to become more relevant, they need to become more actionable, and they need to become more relevant to the day-to-day needs of companies trying to invest, innovate, and grow.
  • And Number 3: Our members are looking for Taiwan to be a source of macro-economic stability in a world that is becoming more uncertain and more fraught with risks than ever before. Stability instills confidence throughout the entire system, and lets business leaders feel assured that their investments will be secure today, and in the future.

To my esteemed colleagues and friends in the room here, I would say this: you’ve all done so much to get Taiwan to the enviable position that it is in today: a thriving, vibrant democracy; a nation of smart, friendly, and hard-working people; and one of the largest trading nations on earth.

At AmCham, we are more optimistic than ever. We have here tonight the public and private sector leaders who will shape the economic future of Taiwan. And while we may not all share the same goals or agendas, what we do share, what does bind us together, is a deep commitment to continued economic growth and prosperity in Taiwan.

Personally, coming back to Taiwan several years ago was a deeply meaningful homecoming for me. I am personally committed to work with the esteemed leaders present in the room here tonight, to ensure that this home that we call Taiwan is a place where we can raise our families, build our businesses, and pursue our dreams in peace and prosperity.

Before I hand over the podium, I’d like to share with you an often-cited African proverb, my favorite proverb in fact, which states, “If you want to go fast, go alone…but if you want to go far, go together.” Tonight, we gather in recognition of the fact that, although there is so much work to do, there is no limit to what we can accomplish, if we do it together.

To President Tsai and Director Moy, we extend our warmest welcome and deepest thanks, and we look forward to years of continued partnership together.  Ladies and gentlemen, please join me in welcoming, Mr. Kin Moy, Director of the American Institute in Taiwan.

President Tsai Addresses AmCham Taipei Banquet, Hsieh Nien Fan

The American Chamber of Commerce in Taipei held its 49th annual Hsieh Nien Fan banquet on March 22nd in the Grand Ballroom of the Grand Hyatt Taipei. This year’s attendance was a record high of nearly 700 AmCham Taipei members and guests.

The purpose of the event is to express thanks to Taiwan government officials, the American Institute in Taiwan (AIT), and other friends of the Chamber for their cooperation and support in the previous year.

Attending for the first time since taking office last May, President Tsai Ing-wen delivered the keynote speech, becoming the fourth president of the Republic of China to do so.  She commended AmCham Taipei, noting that “for 66 years this chamber has served as a vital bridge between Taiwan, the United States, and the business communities of our two countries.” Citing AmCham Taipei’s annual Doorknock delegation to Washington D.C., Tsai said that “without these efforts, the Taiwan-U.S. partnership would not be in the robust health it is in today.”

President Tsai Ing-wen delivered the keynote speech, becoming the fourth president of the Republic of China to do so.

The president said that with a new administration now in office in the United States, “we have entered a new stage of Taiwan-U.S. relations.” She outlined her government’s plans to strengthen that relationship in three areas:

  1. Strategic. Taiwan is supporting peace-keeping efforts in Iraq and Syria by assisting with international mine-removal efforts; in January it also donated a mobile hospital for use in Iraq. In addition, Taiwan will make greater investment in its own defense, to the benefit of peace and stability in the region, and will seek more cooperation with American defense firms as it builds up an indigenous defense industry and procures more military systems from the United States. This initiative, together with programs in aerospace and cybersecurity, will help create thousands of jobs in Taiwan and the U.S., Tsai said.
  2. Trade. The United States is already Taiwan’s second largest trading partner, with trade in goods and services reaching US$85 billion last year. Faced with the Trump administration’s America First policy, however, “Taiwan is prepared to make adjustments” – emphasizing not only free trade but fair trade, the president said. Referring to her background as a trade negotiator, she said “I firmly believe that through communication and negotiation, trade conflicts and other differences can always be resolved.” She stated her hope that Taiwan and the U.S. can “work together toward a new bilateral trade agreement – preferably, of course, FTA-type.”
  3. Investment. Taiwan will send its largest ever delegation to attend the SelectUSA investment summit in Washington this June to actively seek opportunities to invest in the United States. At the same time, Taiwan’s 5+2 innovation program will open new opportunities for cooperation and investment in Taiwan by U.S. companies and for the purchase of American goods.

AmCham Taipei Chairman, Albert Chang, presented President Tsai with the book The Female Lead: Women Who Shape Our World, as a gift to show our gratitude for her participation and support of the event.

Opening the evening were remarks by AmCham Taipei Chairman, Albert Chang, who expressed thanks on behalf of the Chamber to both the Taiwan government and AIT for helping to promote a positive business environment in Taiwan. He stressed the findings of AmCham Taipei’s recent 2017 Business Climate Survey that an already excellent business environment – especially with regard to quality of life and human capital – could easily be further improved through greater regulatory transparency and consistency.

Director Kin W. Moy of the American Institute in Taiwan also spoke, stressing the opportunities for further U.S.-Taiwan economic cooperation through such channels as the ongoing dialogue as part of the TIFA (Trade and Investment Framework Agreement) platform, bilateral Digital Economy Forums, Global Cooperation and Training Framework, International Environmental Partnership, and APEC.

Besides President Tsai, other high-level Taiwan government dignitaries in attendance this year included:

  • National Security Council Deputy Secretary-General Joseph Wu
  • Legislative Yuan Secretary General Jih-Jia Lin
  • Executive Yuan Minister without Portfolio John Chen-Chung
  • Ministry of Interior Minister Jiunn-rong Yeh 
  • Minister of Foreign Affairs Deputy Minister David Tawei Lee
  • Ministry of Science and Technology Minister Liang-Gee Chen
  • Ministry of Health and Welfare Minister Shih-Chung Chen 
  • Environmental Protection Administration Minister Ying-Yuan Lee 
  • National Communications Commission Chairperson Nicole,T.I. Chan

The event would not have been possible without the contribution of the following sponsors:

  • Platinum Sponsor: Citibank
  • Gold Sponsors: Corning Display; Franklin Templeton Investments; Standard Chartered Bank
  • Silver Sponsors: 3M, HSBC, JTI, and Micron
  • Bronze Sponsors: Air Products, American Express, Baker & McKenzie, Dun & Bradstreet, K&L Gates, Philip Morris, Qualcomm, and Siemens
  • General Sponsors: Audi, Ford Lio Ho, Bristol-Myers Squibb, Grand Hyatt Taipei, IBM, Johnson & Johnson, Procter & Gamble, and Tobacco Institute of the Republic of China.
  • Wine & Liquor: Diageo Taiwan, Sergio Valente

2017 Business Climate Survey Press Conference

Representatives of some 30 Taiwan media organizations came to AmCham Taipei’s Lincoln Room today for a briefing by Chamber chairman Albert Chang, managing partner in Taiwan for the global consulting firm McKinsey & Co., on the results of AmCham’s 2017 Business Climate Survey. The seventh annual survey was conducted between October and December last year, with 173 top executives of AmCham’s member companies responding.

Chang stressed that the survey respondents view Taiwan as a positive business environment. Most companies made money in 2016 and expect good revenue and profits in the year to come, and they are continuing to invest in this market and add more employment.

Albert_Chang_BCS_2017

Albert Chang, Chamber chairman Albert Chang, managing partner in Taiwan for the global consulting firm McKinsey & Co., presents AmCham’s 2017 Business Climate Survey.

“The problem is that the pace of improvement is not fast enough,” said Chang. He noted that three areas in particular stood out as needing government attention:

1) Government regulations and the rules-making process. Needed is more transparency, consistency, and prior consultation with stakeholders. Chang commended the government of Premier Lin Chuan for recently increasing the notice and comment period for new regulations from 14 to 60 days, and urged government agencies to fully utilize this platform by providing meaningful responses to public comments.

2) The new Labor Law provisions. Chang described the new amendments as a “big headache for many companies” both in terms of increased costs and continued lack of clarity about how to be in compliance.

3) Cross-Strait relations. “Investors value certainty and stability,” Chang observed.

Other points covered by the survey include:

  • Trade agreements. Although the Trump administration has withdrawn the U.S. from the Trans-Pacific Partnership, new opportunities may arise for strengthening U.S.-Taiwan economic relations through bilateral rather than multilateral channels, possibly including a “free and fair trade agreement” and/or a bilateral investment agreement, said Chang. He said the survey showed strong membership support for bilateral exchanges with the U.S. through the TIFA (Trade and Investment Framework Agreement) process.
  • Tsai administration’s priority objectives. The respondents reported that the five pillar industries that the new government has targeted for development are relevant to their businesses and offer good opportunities for public/private collaboration. Chang called the setting of the policy directions “a good start,” and urged the government to form task forces in each of the five sectors to reach out to the private sector on means of cooperation.
  • Role of the six major municipalities. For the first time, the survey asked members how their businesses are impacted by municipal governments. The results pointed to significant room for improvement in how local governments facilitate business, treat foreign companies, and align their rules with national-level regulations.
  • Personnel. As in past surveys, respondents highly applauded Taiwanese employees’ work ethic and trustworthiness. The main areas of weakness were innovation and creativity.
  • Life in Taiwan. Once again, respondents were enthusiastic about Taiwan as a safe and friendly place to live, with good-quality medical care. Problem areas cited included pedestrian traffic safety and air quality.

Chang noted that Taiwan has lagged behind most other countries in the region in recent years in attracting Foreign Direct Investment. But he said that if the “cloud” of the several key problem areas could be removed, Taiwan should be able to dramatically enhance its investment attractiveness.

To view the full press release, or download the 2017 BCS report, follow the links below:

2017 Business Climate Survey Press Release (English)

2017 Business Climate Survey Press Release (Chinese)

2017 Business Climate Survey Report (PDF)