Posts

Chairman Albert Chang remarks at AmCham’s 50th Annual Hsieh Nien Fan

The American Chamber of Commerce in Taipei held its 50th annual Hsieh Nien Fan banquet on March 21st in the Grand Ballroom of the Grand Hyatt Taipei.

AmCham Taipei Chairman Albert Chang opened the evening by expressing thanks to Taiwan government officials, the American Institute in Taiwan (AIT), and other friends of the Chamber for their shared support in strengthening the US-Taiwan partnership.

A transcript of the chairman’s remarks is as follows:

Good evening! Madam President, AIT Director Moy, Deputy Assistant Secretary Wong, and Distinguished Guests, welcome to AmCham Taipei’s 50th Annual Hsieh Nien Fan.

This is a historic night. We have over seven hundred people here tonight – this is more than we have ever had in half a century of history! We are also joined tonight by Alex Wong. Alex is a dear friend.  We met ten years ago when we were together at Harvard Law School, and he is one of the smartest people that I have ever met.  And so when I called him several months ago inviting him to Taiwan, I was really happy that he accepted, because I am so happy to see my old friend again.  Then when I woke up this morning, I saw a hundred articles about his visit here and the Taiwan Travel Act, these Rockstar pictures. You know Alex, please don’t go getting a big head now, the timing is just a coincidence.

But to be sure, Alex is also the most senior State Department official covering Asia that we have ever had joining our Hsieh Nien Fan in fifty years. Isn’t that amazing? But, to be honest Alex, with all the personnel changes on Twitter these days, we weren’t sure if you would actually make it.

We also want to welcome AIT Director Moy. Kin Moy is also someone that has become a true friend of AmCham.  His genuine passion for Taiwan and his sincere outreach to the community have left a legacy that will be remembered for a long time.

You know my friend, I had all these jokes I wanted to tell about you, but as our AmCham team learned from your speech last year, and as they keep reminding me, “Albert, don’t even try, because Kin Moy is just much funnier than you are.”

We also want to welcome the one hundred government officials here tonight. We are honored to have President Tsai Ing-wen, with us as our keynote speaker – thank you for joining us Madam President. We also welcome almost every Minister and senior official from all branches of government.

Last year, we all had a great dinner together…and then a few months later I ruined your day with news that none of the eighty issues in our White Paper had been solved…

But don’t worry, you can enjoy your dinner this evening, because, after a year of work, out of the eighty issues raised, we have now solved……five.

If that’s not progress, I don’t know what is…

It’s OK everyone, we still have a few more months to go. Jia You!

In all seriousness, there is a lot to celebrate. Fifty years ago, per capita GDP was less than US$400, today it is over US$22,000.  Exports were about to exceed US$1 billion dollars a year for the first time ever.  Today, Taiwan exports that much in one day.

Taiwan’s economic story has been a miracle. And it is only because of that miracle that today, our Business Climate Survey shows that over 80% of our member companies say they are confident that their revenues will grow here over the next three years.  Over half say they plan to increase their employment this year.

Citibank’s main site in Taipei is among its busiest in the world; Corning and Micron both maintain their largest international operations in Taiwan. For McKinsey, Microsoft, Google, Cigna, and many others – Taiwan is one of their central hubs in Asia.  Costco’s Taichung store is the company’s global leader in customers and sales – I hear when everyone in Taiwan was rushing to buy toilet paper, Costco was the only place that had any left!  That’s amazing!

But, despite the accomplishments over the last fifty years…we all share this underlying sense…this nagging feeling…almost among all of us…that Taiwan could be so much more. We all imagine a Taiwan in ten years that looks different…where starting salaries are on the rise rather than at the same level as they were three decades ago…where talent flows inward from all corners of the world rather than only outward…where Taiwan is the place for foreign investment, home to ten times more international companies, thought of in the same way as a Hong Kong or a Singapore – as the place in Asia to invest and the place from which to do business in Asia.

But we know that image we have for a future Taiwan is not what Taiwan looks like today. Because the truth is, if Taiwan wants to be at the center of gravity of a 21st century economy, then it needs a 21st century labor and regulatory system. And here, there is more work to do, in 3 areas.

First, on regulations, 60% of our member companies believe we need more policymaker engagement with the private sector in setting regulations. Second, on labor, 90% believe that in an innovation-based economy, professional and managerial talent should be exempted from the labor law. And third, on the White Paper, there is wide consensus that if we just met global standards, putting us on par with Japan or similar developed economies, then we’d solve most of our 80 issues.

What this tells us is that we need deeper partnership between the public and private sectors. And we need to see labor and regulatory breakthroughs that will spur 10x more investment here. In the spirit of that deeper partnership, we are excited to announce that AmCham has proposed to the Administration that we jointly create an Industry Summit Council. This Council’s aim will be to attract more investment to Taiwan under the pillars of 5+2, and to facilitate the breakthroughs in regulatory improvements to make that possible.  We are excited to roll out the details shortly.

I believe we are all here tonight for some reason. Almost 50 years ago, my parents left Taiwan for the US as young students. My dad was a top student here, and when he first arrived to the US, he almost lost his scholarship because he struggled with his English. Fifty years later, as one of four children, I came back here. And I came back because I believe that there is something special about this place. Because I believe Taiwan’s economic miracle is not over.

And I think if we look around this room, that’s a belief we all share. This idea that Taiwan has not yet reached its full potential.  But that it is within reach.  And if we are going to have any chance to get there, we will have to do it together. That is our shared belief, and that is what binds all of us in this room tonight.

To President Tsai, Director Moy, and DAS Wong, let me extend our warmest welcome to you, and invite you to join us in this vision of deeper partnership together. Ladies and gentlemen, please join me in welcoming, Her Excellency, President Tsai Ing-wen.

“Memo from Taipei” Goes to International Contacts

This month AmCham Taipei sent out the latest edition of our periodic Memo from Taipei designed to update the Chamber’s friends and contacts abroad about the latest developments here. The Memo went to a mailing list of about 135 people, including Washington-based government affairs representatives from our member companies, as well as U.S. government officials, think tank scholars, and others who follow U.S.-Taiwan relations closely.

If your company has a Washington representative that you would like added to the mailing list, please let us know.

The latest Memo announced the appointment of William Foreman as the new President of AmCham Taipei, Albert Chang’s reelection as Chairman for 2018, and the list of other Standing Officers for this year. It also conveyed the following information:

Progress in 2017

  • The Legislative Yuan finished the year on a high note by passing long-awaited amendments to the Pharmaceutical Affairs Act instituting a system of Patent Linkage for pharmaceuticals for the first time. The proposal had been in AmCham Taipei’s Taiwan White Paper for more than a decade, as well as on the agenda of the bilateral TIFA talks between Taiwan and the U.S. The new law creates a mechanism to ensure that generic forms of drugs still under valid patent in Taiwan cannot legally enter the market, and represents a major advance for Taiwan’s intellectual property rights protection.
  • At AmCham Taipei’s urging, the Executive Yuan in October 2016 increased the notice and comment period for new regulations and trade-related legislation from a mere 14 days to a full 60 days, except in cases of emergency. During the past year the Chamber, working together with the National Development Council (NDC), has been tracking the degree of adherence to that provision – and has seen a steady increase in compliance. AmCham’s emphasis is now on encouraging stakeholders to submit their comments and government agencies to provide meaningful feedback. If such dialogue can become the norm, many of the past difficulties in the regulatory regime could be prevented, the Chamber believes.
  • When the 2017 Taiwan White Paper was issued last June, it was disclosed that none of the 80 White Paper issues from the previous edition had been fully resolved. In response, the Taiwan government scheduled a series of quarterly meetings with AmCham committee representatives to discuss outstanding White Paper items in hopes of raising the success rate. So far two such meetings have been held, presided over by an NDC Vice Minister. Final results will be analyzed at the end of a one-year cycle.

 

2018 Advocacy Items

  • AmCham Taipei was disappointed that President Trump chose to withdraw the U.S. from the Trans-Pacific Partnership, as the Chamber viewed the TPP as important for American leadership in the Asia Pacific and hoped that Washington would support Taiwan’s desire to entire the TPP in a second round. Given the President’s aversion to multilateral trade agreements, however, we now urge the United States to consider entering into a bilateral trade agreement with Taiwan, its 10th largest trading partner. We are convinced that such negotiations are the best way to resolve existing bilateral trade issues and to deepen the economic cooperation between the two countries. From both an economic and strategic point of view, this step would be in the best interests of the U.S. At the same time, AmCham Taipei encourages Taiwan to seek eventual membership in the apparent successor to the TPP, the Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership (CPTPP).
  • The Chamber’s member companies, particularly those engaged in high-tech manufacturing, continue to be concerned about the future sufficiency, reliability, and cost of electricity in this market. The Taiwan government has committed itself to shutting down all nuclear power plants by 2025, at the same time sharply cutting back on carbon emissions. AmCham Taipei does not take issue with the aims of the policy, but questions remain as to whether it can be implemented within the designated timeframe given the many challenges involved in rapidly expanding reliance on wind and solar power, as well as the infrastructure to receive imported LNG. For their business planning, both multinational and domestic companies need a clearer energy roadmap from the authorities.
  • The amended Labor Standards Act that took effect last year – instituting new rules for working hours, overtime, and other working conditions – was highly controversial and left both employers and employees dissatisfied. A revised version now before the Legislative Yuan may be a slight improvement but does not tackle what AmCham Taipei considers to be the crux of the problem – the failure to distinguish between professional/managerial personnel and blue-collar workers. Taiwan’s avowed aspiration to develop an innovation-driven economy will not be furthered by treating knowledge workers the same way as those on a factory production line, for example requiring them to clock in and clock out. In fact, that requirement is wholly impractical in an age of global interconnectedness and will constitute a deterrent to investment.

2017 Doorknock Delegation to Washington

AmCham Taipei’s 2017 Doorknock visit to Washington D.C. from June 26 to 30 conducted a total of 45 meetings with U.S. government executive branch agencies (including the State Department, Commerce Department, and the Office of the U.S. Trade Representative), Congressional offices, think tanks, the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, the Taipei Economic & Cultural Representative office in the U.S. (TECRO), and others interested in the U.S.-Taiwan economic relationship.

Delegation members with U.S. House Foreign Affairs Committee Chairman, Congressman Ed Royce

The group was led by Chamber Chairman Albert Chang, Vice Chair Dan Silver, and President Andrea Wu, and also included Raghavendra Shenoy, co-chair of the Medical Devices Committee, Board Supervisor, and General Manager of Johnson & Johnson Medical Taiwan Ltd.; Jenny Zheng, co-chair of the Pharmaceutical Committee and Managing Director of Johnson & Johnson Taiwan Ltd.; Emily Chiang of Medtronic (Taiwan) Ltd.; Stephen Y. Tan of K&L Gates; William Vocke of the Foundation for Scholarly Exchange (Fulbright Taiwan); Lynn Cinelli of MSD Taiwan; Don Shapiro, AmCham Taipei Senior Director; and Amy Chang, AmCham Taipei Senior Director for Government & Public Affairs. They were joined for various meetings by the Washington representatives of such member companies as Bechtel, Cigna, Dell, Eli Lilly and Company, Merck, and Microsoft.

Delegation members with Congressman Ted Yoho

AmCham Taipei Chairman Albert Chang with Congressman Ted Yoho

“A lot has changed in Washington since the Trump administration took office, including a new emphasis on targeting U.S. trade deficits with its trading partners, so it was very useful for us to hear from people first-hand about their expectations for the U.S.-Taiwan relationship,” said Andrea Wu. “For the most part, we heard a hard line on outstanding trade issues from the executive agencies, but tempered by widespread expressions of support for Taiwan from members of Congress.”

Team members with U.S. Senator Ron Wyden

A full report on the Doorknock will appear in the August issue of Taiwan Business TOPICS, both the print and online editions.

USEPA Meets with AmCham Taipei

During a recent visit to Taipei, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) Acting Assistant Administrator Jane Nishida, met with AmCham Taipei on July 7th. Nishida has over 30 years of environmental experience working in federal and state government, and international and nongovernmental organizations. She currently leads EPA’s international and tribal engagements, and works closely with tribal governments, foreign governments, international organizations, and other U.S. agency partners on matters relating to environmental policy and program implementation in tribal lands and internationally.

Justin Harris, Senior Program Manager from the EPA, accompanied Nishida to meet with members from AmCham Taipei, including President Andrea Wu; Sustainable Development Committee Co-chair Kenny Jeng, A/P Product Stewardship Manager of DuPont Taiwan Ltd. and Co-chair Cosmas Lu, Strategy Adviser of Super Dragon Technology Co. Ltd.,; Public and Government Affairs Consultant Stella Lai from Dell Taiwan; and Senior Manager for APJ Environmental Affairs & Producer Responsibility Vivian Tai, also from Dell.

From left to right: Anna Wang, Economic Officer, AIT Econ Section; Kenny Jeng of DuPont Taiwan, AmCham Taipei Sustainable & Development Committee Co-chair; Andrea Wu, AmCham Taipei President; Jane Nishida, USEPA Acting Assistant Administrator; Cosmas Lu of Super Dragon, AmCham Taipei Sustainable Development Committee Co-chair; Stella Lai of Dell Taiwan, AmCham Taipei Tax Committee Co-chair; Vivian Tai, also from Dell Taiwan; and Justin Harris, USEPA Senior Program Manager

The purpose of the trip was to meet with the Taiwan government and U.S. business community to discuss the different elements of the U.S.-Taiwan and APEC regional environmental cooperation. Some of the key areas of discussion include 1) Monitoring Air Quality 2) Mercury Pollution 3) Circular Economy and 4) International E-Waste Network (IEWN). Members of AmCham Taipei also exchanged their views with the USEPA officials on corporate sustainability programs and challenges in the region, especially Taiwan.

Launch of the 2017 Taiwan White Paper

With a morning press conference attended by 28 media outlets and a luncheon presentation before 112 Chamber members and guests, AmCham Taipei released its 2017 Taiwan White Paper on June 8. At the luncheon meeting in the Grand Ballroom of the Mandarin Oriental Taipei, AmCham Chairman Albert Chang and President Andrea Wu officially presented a copy of the new White Paper to Minister Chen Tain-jy of the National Development Council (NDC), who received it on behalf of the Taiwan government.

Minister Chen of the NDC accepted the Taiwan White Paper on behalf of the Taiwan government.

AmCham Taipei has published the Taiwan White Paper annually since 1996 to provide the Taiwan government with constructive suggestions on how to strengthen the business climate. This year marks the 20th year since the White Paper was first published in bilingual format in 1997.

Chang’s briefing focused on five major themes related to the performance of President Tsai Ing-wen’s administration during its first year in office:

  • A major advance in regulatory transparency. Chang said the government’s decision last year to extend the notice and comment period for new laws and regulations from 14 to 60 days was “cause for major celebration.” He said that government agencies’ collection of more input from stakeholders should lead to more effective rule-making, especially if it spurs real dialog between the regulators and the regulated.
  • Opportunities for investment. The administration’s ambitious “5+2 Innovative Industries” plan has attracted interest from foreign companies, especially in the fields of the Internet of Things, biomedical, and green energy. But Chang cautioned against allowing the construction of physical facilities to overshadow the need to foster the right innovation-stimulating “software” by cultivating talent, creativity, and culture.
  • A problematic labor law. Recent amendments to the Labor Standards Law are geared to the factory-based circumstances of the “old economy” rather than the service-centered, knowledge-oriented model that must constitute Taiwan’s future. The rigid rules on working hours, overtime, and other working conditions will in fact serve to stifle creativity. Means must be found to incorporate more flexibility into the rules.
  • Continued energy uncertainty. For Taiwan industry, it is crucial to have sufficient, reliable, and cost-competitive electrical power. But many observers are unsure how Taiwan will be able to achieve that objective while also meeting its announced dual goals of eliminating nuclear power and drastically cutting carbon emissions. Industry needs the government to provide a clear roadmap for Taiwan’s future energy development.
  • Bolster trade ties with the United States. Although the future of the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) is now very much in doubt after the U.S. pull-out, Taiwan still needs to find ways to diversify trade and avoid marginalization in the international economic arena. AmCham supports the idea of “free and fair” bilateral trade agreement between Taiwan and the United States. Taiwan after all is America’s 10th largest trading partner, and the two have enjoyed a long and fruitful economic relationship. Although the Trump administration has opposed multilateral agreements, it has left the door open to bilateral pacts, and Taiwan would be a highly suitable negotiating partner as long as it is willing to follow international standards and practices in its trade policies.

In addition to those broad themes, the 2017 Taiwan White Paper includes 83 sector-specific recommendations from 24 AmCham committees or industry groups.

Looking back at the 80 suggestions raised by AmCham committees in the 2016 Taiwan White Paper, the Chamber found that not a single one had been fully resolved in the past year, although eight issues were rated as showing satisfactory progress. Chang said the lack of complete resolution of any issues was reason for concern but not pessimism.

“We hope to work closely with the government to bring about more traction on issues of importance to our member companies,” he said.

To facilitate that progress, AmCham this year identified 12 Priority Issues for Special Attention, selected as having both the potential for high impact and feasibility for relatively early resolution. The Chamber is asking the government to assign a point-person to be responsible for monitoring the progress of all 80 suggestions, but especially the 12 Priority Issues, and to liaise with AmCham at least every quarter to discuss their status.

In remarks delivered after accepting the White Paper, Minister Chen said the government values its longstanding good relationship with AmCham and will take the White Paper recommendations very seriously.

View the full photo gallery here

Two Congresswomen Visit AmCham Taipei

Representative Brenda Lawrence (D-MI) and Representative Nanette Barragan (D-CA) called at the AmCham Taipei office on May 9 during their three-day stay in Taiwan. Accompanied by Congresswoman Lawrence’s legislative aide Alex Huang, a Taiwanese-American, they met with the Chamber’s Senior Director Don Shapiro, Senior Director for Government & Public Affairs Amy Chang, and Government & Public Affairs Manager Erica Lai. The group was joined by two representatives from Herbalife Nutrition, whose headquarters in the Los Angeles area is near Congresswoman Lawrence’s district: Taiwan General Manager Ceasar Chen and Senior Manager for Regulatory, Government & Industry Affairs Alex Lin.

Representative Lawrence explained that the main purpose of the trip was to make up for her inability to come last year for the inauguration of President Tsai Ing-wen and Vice President Chen Chien-jen. But she and Representative Barragan, whose district is in Detroit, were also looking for potential business opportunities in Taiwan for companies in their districts. As skilled manpower training and port operations are among their particular interests, their itinerary included Taiwan’s occupational training center and Kaohsiung Harbor.

From left to right: Amy Chang, Chamber’s Senior Director for Government & Public Affairs; Don Shapiro, Chamber’s Senior Director; Representative Nanette Barragan (D-CA); Representative Brenda Lawrence (D-MI); Caesar Chen, General Manager, Herbalife Taiwan Inc.; Alex Lin, Senior Manager of Worldwide Regulatory, Government, & Industry Affairs at Herbalife Taiwan Inc.

Leadership Meeting with AIT Chairman James Moriarty

During his latest visit to Taiwan, the U.S.-based chairman of the American Institute in Taiwan, Ambassador James Moriarty, exchanged views with members of the AmCham Taipei leadership today at a breakfast discussion. The two sides discussed the relationship between the United States and Taiwan, including economic ties, as well as regional issues.

AmCham leaders also briefed the AIT chairman on such subjects as the Chamber’s 2017 Business Climate Survey, difficulties for companies and employees caused by recent revisions in the Labor Standards Law, and prospective business opportunities arising from the government’s Asia·Silicon Valley plan to promote the digital economy.

Attending the meeting from AIT Taipei were Economic Section Chief Jeff Horwitz, Commercial Section Chief Ireas Cook, and Economic Section Deputy Chief Michael Pignatello. Representing AmCham were President Andrea Wu, Vice Chairman Daniel Tseng, Government Relations Committee Co-chair Paul Cassingham, AmCham Secretary and IP&L Committee Co-chair Vincent Shih, AmCham Governor Leo Seewald, AmCham Supervisor and Travel & Tourism Committee Co-chair Anita Chen, Retail Committee Co-chair Mark Chen, Sustainable Development Committee Co-chair Kenny Jeng, Senior Director and Taiwan Business TOPICS Editor-in-chief Don Shapiro, and Senior Director for Government & Public Affairs Amy Chang.

Technology Licensing Expert Dialogue

The American Chamber of Commerce in Taipei (AmCham), in partnership with the American Institute in Taiwan (AIT) and the Taipei Economic and Cultural Representative Office in the United States (TECRO), and the Taiwan–USA Industrial Cooperation Office (TUSA), hosted a Technology Licensing Expert Dialogue on March 30.

Building on the success of the second Digital Economy Forum in October, 2016, the dialogue brought together legal and technology experts from the United States and Taiwan to discuss practical guidance on the booming US$5 billion trade in technology licensing. The esteemed speakers included Hong Shu-ming, Director General of the Taiwan Intellectual Protection Office (TIPO) and the Honorable Judge Sidney H. Stein of the United States District Court Southern District of New York, who opened the forum.

Hosted by Kris Kvols, economic officer at AIT, over 100 participants listened to presentations discussing myriad complexities of licensing technology between American, Taiwanese, and Chinese markets.

Special Luncheon: Time to Revamp the Company Act

More than 15 years has passed since the Company Act was last amended in 2001. Comprehensive amendments are widely viewed as long overdue given the many challenges arising from the transformation of industries, the emergence of micro e-commerce businesses, the aging population, the increasing importance of stakeholders, and environmental sustainability.

On March 29th, we invited members and guests to join an important workshop, “Time to Revamp the Company Act” led by the “Steering Committee of Company Act Reform” (the Steering Committee). The effort was aimed at discussing proposed amendments and recommendations to Taiwan’s Company Act.  At the workshop, participants were able to ask questions and network with people facing similar challenges and issues.

* This event was conducted in Chinese. 

From left to right: Chen Yen-liang (陳彥良) Professfor at NTU, Huang Ming-jye  (黃銘傑) Professfor at NTU, Faung Kai-lin (方嘉麟) Professor at Chengchi University, Andrea Wu AmCham Taipei President, Tseng Wang-ruu (曾宛如) Professor at NTU, Vivian Ho (何嘉容) Tax Partner at KPMG, Chu Te-fang (朱德芳) Professor at Chengchi University

Topics covered at the workshop:

  • Explanations on why changes to the Company Act are so urgently needed
  • The foreign laws that have been considered and approaches undertaken by the committee during their study
  • The major proposed revise to the Company Act
  • The government and the general public reaction to the proposed changes
  • Any feedback from AmCham members?

Interested in attending our events? Join us at other upcoming events, click here.

Note: AmCham events are intended primarily for AmCham members and their guests. Many events are open to members’ guests and other non-members, but the attendance of any non-member must be approved in advance. AmCham reserves the right not to admit a non-member to any event without explanation.

Event Reminder: Technology Licensing Expert Dialogue

The American Chamber of Commerce in Taipei is pleased to co-host with the Taiwan-USA Industrial Cooperation Promotion Office (TUSA) of the Ministry of Economic Affairs and The American Institute in Taiwan (AIT) a “Technology Licensing Expert Dialogue” on March 30, 2017. Members of the media are invited to cover the opening session of the dialogue.

Members of the media who plan to cover this event are required to sign up with AIT’s Public Diplomacy Section by noon on March 29 via email to AITinfo@mail.ait.org.tw or fax 2162-2242.

Event:             Technology Licensing Expert Dialogue

Time:               9:00 – 10:00 a.m., Thursday, March 30, 2017

Venue:             AIT’s American Center – 21st Floor, 333 Keelung Road, Section 1, Taipei

Language:        English with simultaneous interpretation

 

Agenda:

08:40 – Media registration

09:00 – Welcome remarks by Christian Marchant, Acting Deputy Director, AIT

  • Remarks by Mei-hua Wang, Vice Minister, Ministry of Economic Affairs
  • Remarks by Mark Cohen, Senior Counsel, United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO)

09:20 – Group Photos

09:25 – Keynote Speeches

  • TIPO, Your Best Partner!, Shu-min Hong, Director General, TIPO (Taiwan Intellectual Property Office)
  • Maximizing IP Commercialization:  Less is More, Honorable Judge Sidney H. Stein, United States District Court Southern District of New York

10:00 – Opening Session Concludes

The expert dialogue will address the legal framework and provide practical guidance for industry participants in the thriving US$5 billion U.S.-Taiwan licensing trade.  This trade creates value through spurring innovation, disseminating technology, and generating income for intellectual property owners through technology transfer and commercialization. This program is being held in furtherance of the October 2016 Digital Economy Forum, at which both sides affirmed the importance of intellectual property rights and licensing to expand two-way technology trade and investment between the two economies.

For more information, please contact the AmCham Government & Public Affairs or tel: 02-2718-8226 ext. 213